Tag Archives: culture

SusanLHart.com

Hawaiian Respect & Harmony

Approximately 1,500 years ago, the Hawaiian Islands were discovered by Polynesian colonists who sailed double-hulled canoes on voyages from various parts of the South Pacific. Hawaiian legend says that the demigod Maui pulled the islands up from the ocean depths with his magic hook, and caught the sun with his net from atop Haleakala mountain, in order to slow it down and lengthen the day.

Living in Harmony with the Land & Each Other

Early Hawaiians believed that the earth was a living being with its own consciousness. They never tried to dominate the land, but believed in respecting and living in harmony with it. In Hawaiian language, this is called “pono”, or being in harmony with ones SELF and the ENVIRONMENT, for they are all elements of one energy.

By the time Captain Cook arrived in 1778, several hundred thousand Polynesian people who were skilled farmers, fishermen and craftsmen had established themselves on the islands. In Hawaiian culture, successful cohabitation with the land depended on several principles. These involved cooperation and a sense of community among the people who worked the land. Caring for the land (malama aina) was accomplished through working together (lokahi) and using many hands (laulima).

The Importance of Community

This strong sense of community was reflected in the formation of extended families (family is “ohana”), and the building of gathering places (long house is “halau”). Heiau (temples) were built, and the “spirit realm” was honored and respected during all phases of planting and harvesting, as well as in other aspects of Hawaiian life.

There is an inherent love of and reverence for the land in Hawaii. This is still maintained by many of its inhabitants even in these modern times, including by the haoles (non-native Hawaiians). Being greeted with love (aloha) and invited into a home to eat (Aloha, e ai kakou) is still a very strong tradition and a mark of good manners in the Hawaiian Islands.

Looking to the Future

Is it possible that we might more widely incorporate cooperation and respect for the Earth (and each other) into our modern societies? If so, perhaps our world could become a more expansive and fulfilling place to exist.

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Photos courtesy Troy Squillaci and Matthew DeVries, Pexels

Hawaiian Respect & Harmony © 2017, 2020

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The Search for More in You

Hello, and I hope all is well with you today.

We are certainly living in some trying times. During the process of blogging for the past year, the most important theme has been about evaluating ourselves, our strengths, and how we might think differently about our own self-reliance and use that to navigate through these times.

Also, how to recognize that we actually have a lot of personal power to make the world a better place. The fate of the world and our futures is not out of our hands, but rather it is in our own minds and hearts.

I am currently offering a gift booklet of some reader favorites from the past year. It’s an introspective read about my most amazing subject ~ You (Us).

If you are interested, just click on the book cover below to claim your gift copy.

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Thank you for following ~ Susan

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SusanLHart.com

Rainbow Warriors Legend

The Maori of New Zealand have many ancient legends and stories to explain their beginnings, their ancestors, their deep connection with Papataanuku (Mother Earth), and their relationship with Io, the supreme spiritual power.

The Three Baskets of Knowledge is the story of Tane, who was called to make the journey and ascend through the many realms to the uppermost realm, occupied only by Io-Matua-Kore, God-the-Parentless, to obtain from Io the three baskets of knowledge and bring the wisdom back to Earth for the benefit of all humankind.

Archetypal journey of the mystic

Looked at simply, it is a story that explains how humankind gained knowledge of things both earthly and spiritual. However, at a deeper level, it is a metaphor for the archetypal inner journey of the mystic, as he or she travels inwards, seeking always to find unity with the universe, and to become one with his or her concept or knowing of Io or God or the Supreme Being or the Way.

The Maori song  about Tane’s journey, “He oriori mo Tuteremoana”, speaks of the incredible gift we are endowed with as part of the Source of all spiritual energy, and that is the power to create whatever we desire with our minds.

“Listen O son. There was only one spiritual energy that transported Tane to the Uppermost realm; it was the spiritual power of the mind.”

Rainbow bridge between worlds

The rainbow as a bridge between realms and as a sign of hope and inspiration for the world is found in countless legends and stories of the indigenous cultures. For instance, the Maori legend of Uenuku and the Mist Maiden is a testimony to the power of love, and the rainbow represents love in all its shades. The rainbow is a reminder of the covenant between land and sky, mortal and immortal, earthbound and celestial.

Tiwhana mai i e rangi a Uenuku-rangi! Span the skies, great rainbow of Uenuku!

Coming of the Golden Age

Many indigenous cultures believe that under the symbol of the rainbow, humanity will come into balance with one another and the Earth to experience the Golden Age. However, first an alignment with spiritual values, a healing between brothers and sisters, and a renewed reverence and appreciation for the Earth must take place.

The legends promise that when the devastation (especially as it was wrought upon the native peoples and upon the land itself) is at its worst, spiritually aligned souls among peoples of all colors, peoples of the rainbow, will feel a calling of Spirit and come together to bring things back to proper balance. These souls, who would do no violence and would work to end violence, would be called the Rainbow Warriors.

Let’s take a good look around us… It would appear that the time of the Rainbow Warriors has come.

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Photos courtesy Alex and James Wheeler, Pexels

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Rainbow Warriors Legend” © Susan L Hart 2019

Quotation from “He oriori mo Tuteremoana” is by Tuhotoariki, grand-uncle of Tuteremoana, the most famous descendant ot Tara, eponymous ancestor of the Maori Ngai Tara tribe. He lived nineteen or twenty generations ago. At his birth Tuhotoariki composed a well known oriori or song chant, “He oriori mo Tuteremoana”, which has survived to this day. Tohotoariki was a famous tohunga or priest of his time, and his oriori contains many spiritual teachings for his high born grand-nephew.

SusanLHart.com

Are your Thoughts your Own?

We live in an information society unprecedented in history. Constantly bombarded with images and words from radio, television, print media, and the Internet, we have scarcely a moment of quiet solitude to hear our own inner voices. And therefore by extension, to be in touch with our innate wisdom. Whatever our conscious minds are not aware of, or care not to deal with in the moment, our subconscious is absorbing and filing away. Let’s face it; there are many external forces at work vying for a piece of our minds.

Essential to free thinking:

We cannot be autonomous, free-thinking individuals who rule our own thoughts and beliefs unless we (a) apply discernment to what information sources we give our conscious attention to, (b) apply critical thinking to information we take in, rather than just accepting it at face value, (c) commit to decoupling from media channels that knowingly apply negative subconscious programming, and (d) combine thoughtful analysis with our feeling awareness of the truth.

Critical thinking is an intellectual process involving questioning, examining, and analyzing information in order to come to one’s own conclusions. Too often, perhaps out of a lack of confidence in ourselves, or a belief that a particular media source is “expert”, honest, and unbiased, or out of just plain laziness, we readily accept prepackaged information as fact and incorporate it into our perception of reality.

Different points of view:

The daily news is perhaps the easiest to absorb without question, as we presume it to be fact based; it is supposed to be “real”. The problem is, from whose perspective is it real? While observing an accident on the street one day, I became aware of conclusions I was coming to based on a certain set of personal beliefs. Upon further analysis, I was shocked at what a narrow and judgmental viewpoint I had. I’m sure that for as many onlookers there were that day, there were as many versions of the “truth” about what really happened.

News reporters are trained to gather facts and present them in an unbiased and objective way, based strictly on the who, what, where, when, and why of the event. Ideally, opinion based on a personal viewpoint does not come into it. However, as objective as the individual news stories may be, their sum total in the newspaper or on the TV news show often paints a depressing collective picture of problems, fear, and impending doom. “The news” as a whole is frequently not unbiased. It is very much biased towards a negative viewpoint, where through select inclusions and exclusions, the audience is encouraged to think and feel a certain way about society and “reality”.

Ask yourself these questions:

The daily news affects our thinking, our emotions, and ultimately our collective belief system. Have you ever taken an objective look at it and asked yourself these kinds of questions:

“How much do I rely on just one media source for information on current events?” (One point of view).

“Who owns the media I follow, and what intent lies behind the particular slant or viewpoint in the content they are presenting to me?”

“Do I accept information I am receiving as ‘fact’ without question?”

“What kinds of beliefs are being reinforced by the media content I am taking in? Do they project an expansive world of joy and possibilities, or a world of fear, control, and limitations?”

“How do I feel when I am finished watching or reading about the daily news?”

“How much is it preoccupying my thoughts and affecting my own personal sense of empowerment in the world?”

“Is it really serving me well to immerse myself in it day after day?”

Taking back ownership of our own minds is an important first step towards creating a new world. Our minds are powerful tools of creation, and as long as we allow them to be cluttered with negativity and despair, that is all we will ever experience. What will you choose to focus your mind on tomorrow … The media’s projection of doom and gloom, or your own glorious vision of your life and the world you live in?

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Are your Thoughts your Own? © Susan L Hart 2019

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