Category Archives: Inspiration Author

SusanLHart.com

Be the Change You Wish For

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” This simple but powerful statement is oft attributed as a quote by Mahatma Gandhi. However, apparently the actual full quote by Gandhi was:

“We but mirror the world. All the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body. If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. This is the divine mystery supreme. A wonderful thing it is and the source of our happiness. We need not wait to see what others do.”

The essence remains the same. We must stop waiting for others to make the change we desire. We as individuals ARE the change.

Are You Waiting for Change?

It’s so simple really, and yet we persist in believing that other people or institutions are going to change our circumstances for us. We see this tendency when people are looking for life partners. They get swept up in those initial love feelings, and they believe that the other person is going to “complete them” for a lifetime. Divorce statistics say that this sort of thinking is faulty. When we adhere to that philosophy we cheat ourselves from our own soul work and growth. We should be striving to complete ourselves.

It is not someone else’s job to complete us, nor should we be waiting for external forces to change the world for us. Yes, we elect our government officials, and we should be able to have faith in the fact that they will work for our good. Unfortunately, currently we live in a world where we’re feeling increasingly betrayed by the officials we elect.

It’s time to change our thinking towards how we’ll contribute to and make the world a good place. It is so very fundamental. You cannot receive that which you yourself are not willing to give.

You desire more kindness in the world? Be kind.
You desire more love? Be loving.
I could go on with more examples, but you get the idea.

We Must Each be the Change

We build a world around us that is of our own vision and making. That’s not just at a micro level of our immediate surroundings. These behaviors ripple outward. Other people learn from us by example, then together we build a better world. We should also expect from our leaders what we are working to build for ourselves. Otherwise, why should we keep them around?

So now I ask you, what kind of world will you personally choose to build today? Whether you believe it or not, the fate of the world rests in your own hands.

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Be the Change You Wish For © Susan L Hart 2020

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SusanLHart.com

Eduardo & the Green Obsidian

Meeting Eduardo was a delightful surprise. And so, for that matter, was the green obsidian.

On a bright summer afternoon, I walked down an El Centro street just after a lunch with my friend Barbara. In that moment I was in a very good mood. The city streets were already quiet by then, as many shops had closed at 1 pm. Sunday starts on Saturday here in Ecuador!

I casually noticed a young man sitting on a stoop as I passed him. He appeared to be one of the transient travelers often seen on the downtown streets, selling their handmade jewelry to make money. About four paces past him, I was stopped in my tracks. A voice in my head said clearly, “You MUST go back. This young man needs your help.”

I continued to pause and I listened. The direction was repeated. I have learned not to ignore my intuitions, so…

I about-faced and walked back. He looked up from his work and smiled warmly. Rather than displaying his jewelry on a ground cloth, he had devised an upright stand so it could be viewed at eye level. Aside from his beautiful handmade necklaces and bracelets, he was also reselling some cheap trinkets. The first thing to catch my eye was a small, silvery Eiffel Tower.

Thought to self, “Ah yes. Paris. Some day…”  But, I knew buying a $2 charm was not going to make Eduardo’s day a whole lot better.

I continued to look. Many of his necklaces featured turquoise. But as much as it is my favorite stone, nothing really grabbed me. Then suddenly, Eduardo handed me a necklace from the other side of the stand. And the moment my eyes fell on it, I knew it was meant for me. Sleek and smooth, largish and tear-drop shaped, the stone set in the necklace was a dark, lustrous opaque green. Held up to the light, I could see faint rainbow colors. There was a magic to it.

I told him in Spanish it was the piece I wanted. I did not dicker on the price in this case. I was happy enough with what he quoted, and, I had a deep sense that Eduardo badly needed the money. I expressed my delight at the beauty of the stone. He seemed pleased. He told me it was obsidiana (Spanish for obsidian) and it was very special to the Mayan people.

Eduardo had woven the obsidian into a thread neckband of olive green and black. He invited me to sit beside him so he could fit the length to me and add the clasp. But when he took out his lighter to burn the thread ends (as I had just seen him doing on a bracelet as I walked up), the flame failed to ignite. At that exact moment, Eduardo reached his “completely broke” point. He sheepishly asked to borrow a dollar so he could purchase a new lighter.

I said sure. He procured one from the store next door, then sat beside me again. I asked his name and where he was from. Peru. He had only been in Ecuador for a couple of weeks. We chatted happily while he worked, me in my broken Spanish and he in his imperfect English. It didn’t matter about the gaps. We understood each other in all the ways that were important.

As Eduardo was making the final fitting, a young couple walked up and the woman exclaimed how beautiful the necklace looked. It was me! I paid Eduardo the money, and we cheek kissed in the Spanish way before I departed.

He looked at me. “Esta fue una reunión de corazones, si Susanna?”

I smiled. “Yes, Eduardo. It was a true meeting of hearts.”

I hugged him, then proceeded on my way.

As it turned out, this meeting was not just about Eduardo’s predicament. I also had been working through a rough period in my life. When I later researched it, I discovered that green obsidian is a Gaia Stone and is sometimes called “The Soul of the Earth”. It is associated with the heart chakra and is said to promote loving relationships between people. Green obsidian is very sacred to the Mayan people.

Later I had the stone mounted in a silver wire so I would wear it more often. Because of the special way it came to me, the green obsidian represents my love for humanity. When I wear it, I feel connected to the All and loved in return.

It magically found me at just the right time. The messenger was Eduardo.

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Eduardo & the Green Obsidian ©  Susan L Hart 2017

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The Search for More in You

Hello, and I hope all is well with you today.

We are certainly living in some trying times. During the process of blogging for the past year, the most important theme has been about evaluating ourselves, our strengths, and how we might think differently about our own self-reliance and use that to navigate through these times.

Also, how to recognize that we actually have a lot of personal power to make the world a better place. The fate of the world and our futures is not out of our hands, but rather it is in our own minds and hearts.

I am currently offering a gift booklet of some reader favorites from the past year. It’s an introspective read about my most amazing subject ~ You (Us).

If you are interested, just click on the book cover below to claim your gift copy.

TheSearchForMoreInYou_SusanLHart_Cover2

Thank you for following ~ Susan

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SusanLHart.com

Hawaiians & the Sacred Aloha

Hawaii is one of the major tourist spots in the world, and if you spend all of your time in Honolulu and Waikiki, a tourist experience is exactly what you will have. However, when I ventured outside of the blatantly tourist areas, Hawaii began to really show herself to me. I discovered islands of breathtaking tropical beauty, a slower speed of living, a quiet grace, and inevitably I found the spirit of “aloha”.

It’s not just a word, but a way of living

Aloha. From the native Hawaiian language, this word is rooted in “alo”, meaning presence or face, and “ha”, meaning breath. Aloha is most commonly used for both hello and goodbye, however, this word runs much deeper than these superficial meanings. In the Hawaiian culture, words have “mana” (pronounced: mah’nah, meaning spiritual or divine power), and aloha is among the most sacred. Aloha is a greeting of love when expressed with sincerity.

Aloha is embraced by Hawaiians and haoles alike. (Haole is the Hawaiian term for anyone not native Hawaiian or Polynesian.) The culture as a collective practices the spirit of aloha in daily life and human interaction. The essence of Hawaii has this subtle way of pulling one back to the basics of life – the beauty of nature, and what is important between human beings.

Your words have great power

Aloha. This one word typifies the power of our language, and how we affect other people with it. Words are potent, therefore it behooves us to choose and use them wisely. In this muddled up, confused and too-often-angry world, sometimes we feel powerless to change it in any significant, positive way. However our words, over which we have sole control and responsibility, are one way we can do that.

Aloha. Change the world.

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Hawaiians & the Sacred Aloha © Susan L Hart

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