Gratitude for the sun

Gratitude for the sun

Just where would we be without the sun? We pretty much know the answer to that, so, the haiku is my little expression of gratitude for the sun. The sun is the biggest thing going in our universe (one site says 1.3 million Earths will fit inside it!), yet we get up day after day and just take for granted that it’s still up there in the sky, doing its job.

Being an astrological fire sign, ruled by the sun and born in summer, I’ve been an avid sun worshiper since way back. So, I thought it would be fun to do a little research on the sun for this post. There’s a little something here for the scientist, the traveler, and/or the astrologer in you:

For the Scientist

I went straight to the NASA site, where I discovered that on Jan. 31st, 2019 (just 9 days ago!) NASA’s Parker Solar Probe reached the point in its orbit farthest from Earth, called aphelion, and started the 2nd of its 24 planned orbits around the sun. (Where have I been, living under a rock?) The entire NASA article here.

And for you science types who feel the need to delve deeper, you’ll find 70 interesting footnoted facts about the sun at theFACTfilePersonally, I was relieved to read that the sun is 4.5 billion years old and only halfway through its lifetime. That means I don’t need to spend a nano-second of my precious worry time on whether the sun will blink out before I do. Whew! And apparently, it’s as bright as 4 trillion trillion 100-watt light bulbs. (The double trillion is not a typo.) So, I’m going to be just a tad more careful about wearing my sunnies going forward!

For the traveler

And speaking of sun worshiping, many ancient cultures have done just that. One of the biggest ceremonies still occurs in our modern times in the city of Cuzco, Peru, near the ancient Incan site Machu Picchu. (I have not been there yet; it’s on my list. But I have been to a smaller such celebration in Ecuador, where there are also Inca ruins.) The Incas were sun worshipers, and Inti Raymi (in the Quechua language Inti means Sun and Raymi celebration) is celebrated each year at the summer solstice in appreciation of the Sun God. More about Inti Raymi at Discover Peru.

For the astrologer

And as you might well imagine, the sun plays an important role in astrological readings. Cafe Astrology says, “the Sun directs us, and can be considered ‘the boss’ of our chart”. (Are we surprised?)

So I don’t know about you, but this all brings me back to a place of gratitude:

Grateful for you, Sun.
Your ceaseless radiance greets
and anchors my day.

Hart Haiku

© Susan L Hart 2019
Related poem: Gaia the Earth Goddess
Photo courtesy Pixabay, Pexels